Categories
Faculty Projects

Lewis Henry Morgan Bicentennial

This project aims to mark Morgan’s bicentennial by revisiting his various legacies, recovering and publicizing them while at the same time critically reevaluating them.

Categories
Faculty Projects

The Lazarus Project

The Lazarus Project is a multi-spectral imaging project. It envelopes smaller initiatives that span many geographical locations and time periods. In the past, recovery efforts by studentsconsultants, and directors have discerned new scholarly information on French, Welsh and Italian manuscripts from the Medieval era.

Categories
Blog Newsletter

October 2017 Newsletter

 

 

 

 

DH Lunch
Mellon Digital Humanities Fellows at the University of Rochester are pleased to invite you to attend our second DH lunch this semester, organized in collaboration with the Global DH Group. Please RSVP by October 17th. For more information, please see our October Newsletter below or visit our website at https://humanities.lib.rochester.edu/mellondh. 

 

 

RSVP

DECOLONIZING DIGITAL NETWORKS: WOMEN OF COLOR FEMINISM, OPEN ACCESS, AND WHAT IT MEANS TO BE WOKE

Thursday, October 19th, 1pm
Gamble Room, Rush Rhees Library
(Lunch will be provided.)
Lisa Nakamura is the Gwendolyn Calvert Baker Collegiate Professor in the Department of American Cultures at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is one of the leading scholars in the field of critical digital media studies/digital humanities. From coining the concept of “cybertype” as distinctive ways that the internet propagates, disseminates, and commodifies images of race and racism, to locating the internet as a privileged and extremely rich site for the creation and distribution of hegemonic and counterhegemonic visual images of racialized bodies, Nakamura has significantly contributed to the theory of racial formation in digital cultures. Her publications include Race After the Internet (2011, co-edited with Peter Chow-White) and Digitizing Race: Visual Cultures of the Internet (2007).

 

 

SYMPOSIUM: MACHINE-READING AND CROWDSOURCING MEDIEVAL MUSIC MANUSCRIPTS (Eastman School of Music)

 

 

 

Thursday, October 26th

An international group of scholars will provide the state of digital humanities research as it relates to studies of medieval music manuscripts, including machine-reading of early music notation and collaborative techniques for indexing manuscripts of medieval chant. An evening performance by the women of Chicago-based early music ensemble Schola Antiqua features a pre-modern convent program, including music associated with a 13th-century Italian convent, which will be discussed in the morning sessions. The concert also includes keyboard pieces and some of the earliest known polyphony associated with nuns.

Half-Day Symposium
9 AM – 12:30 PM
Hatch Recital Hall | Eastman East Wing
FREE and open to the public. Registration recommended. Register Here   

 

 

 

Newsletter Submission

The Mellon DH Fellows are creating a newsletter this year to serve as an outlet for DH-related events in the greater Rochester area. As we prepare for our October newsletter, we would love to include any DH-related announcements you would like to make. To make a submission, please contact us at urmellonfellows@gmail.com by 12:00pm, Friday, November 3. The final version of the newsletter will be sent out the first week of October. Announcements must be 50 words or less and include relevant information: date and time, how to RSVP, and a link to the relevant webpage. We reserve the right to edit for space but encourage links or visuals for readers who are interested to learn more information. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Categories
Blog Newsletter

September 2017 Newsletter

 

DH Lunch
Mellon Digital Humanities Fellows at the University of Rochester are pleased to invite you to attend our first DH lunch this semester. Please RSVP by September 18th. For more information, please see our September Newsletter below or visit our website at https://humanities.lib.rochester.edu/mellondh. 

RSVP
Friday, September 22, 2017 12pm
Humanities Center, Conference Room D
James J. Brown, Jr., Assistant Professor of English and Director of the Digital Studies Center, Rutgers University-CamdenRobert A. Emmons, Jr., Assistant Professor of Fine Arts and Associate Director of the Digital Studies Center, Rutgers University-CamdenIn 2014, Robert Emmons and Jim Brown launched the Rutgers-Camden Archive of Digital Ephemera (R-CADE), a collection of digital artifacts made available for research and creative activities. Scholars are free to take apart, dissect, and repurpose artifacts in the R-CADE as they attempt to understand their historical and cultural significance. While the R-CADE does not preserve in the sense of keeping objects in their “original” condition, the archive is in fact an exercise in the preservation of digital culture. The R-CADE has expanded and changed in the intervening three years, and this presentation will discuss the genesis of the project, its theoretical underpinnings, and how the annual R-CADE Symposium has grown. Emmons and Brown will share some of the work that has emerged from the R-CADE and will discuss some of the project’s future directions.

New Fellows
This fall, we also welcome four new fellows to the Mellon Digital Humanities Graduate Program. More information about the incoming fellows can be found below.

Helen Davies

Education: B.A. History and Classical Civilizations with minors in Latin, Medieval Studies, Anthropology, Loyola University Chicago, 2009; M.A. Medieval Studies, University of York, 2011; M.A. Digital Humanities, 2013.

Biography: Helen Davies is a second year PhD student in English. Her interests focus on the early medieval multi-cultural British Isles, medieval maps, and digital humanities. She is digitally recovering the Vercelli Mappa Mundi through the use of multispectral imaging. This project fits into a larger dissertation on place and space in medieval literature. Helen serves as the graduate student coordinator of The Lazarus Project (lazarusprojectimaging.com). Additionally, she has helped set up and coordinate R-CHIVE, an inter-university cultural heritage imaging cooperation between the University of Rochester and the Rochester Institute of Technology. Helen hopes to use her time as Mellon fellow to explore the intersection between Digital Humanities, Medieval Manuscripts, and pedagogy.

James Rankine

Education: BA, History with Honours First Class, University of Queensland, 2005; MA, History, University of Rochester, 2014.

Biography: James Rankine is a fifth year PhD Candidate in the Department of History. His dissertation examines the cultural and social history of pirates, piracy and violence in the early modern Atlantic. In particular, James’ work seeks to reassess our understanding of pirates’ careers and culture by highlighting the ways in which their historical reality radically differs from popular memory. James has also spent several seasons as a site supervisor for the University of Rochester’s Smith’s Island Archeology Project under Professor Michael Jarvis.. He is currently working on PirateDB a digital database which collects and displays hundreds of contemporary newspaper reports of pirate activity across the Atlantic world. Currently, James serves as a teaching assistant in the Digital Media Studies Essential Digital Media Toolkit course along with the other first year Mellon Fellows.

Oishani Sengupta

Education: B.A. in English Literature, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, 2013; M.A. in English Literature, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 2015.

Biography: Oishani Sengupta is a third year PhD student in the Department of English. Her work focuses on illustrated novels in the Victorian period and their role in shaping national and cultural identity. Oishani works as a Research Assistant for the William Blake Archive where she participates in two specialized teams that are prototyping digital editions of The Four Zoas and Blake’s marginalia. As an Andrew W. Mellon Digital Humanities fellow, she hopes to explore methods of designing and implementing digital image archives and study the changing relationships of image and text in the nineteenth century. Currently, she serves as a teaching assistant in the Digital Media Toolkit course with the other first year Mellon Fellows.

Julia Tulke

Education: B.A. Social and Cultural Anthropology, Free University Berlin, 2011; M.A. European Ethnology, Humboldt University Berlin, 2014.

Biography: Julia Tulke is a third year PhD student in the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies. Her work focuses on street art and graffiti as mediums of expression and dissent in cities undergoing social and political crises. In this context she has conducted extensive ethnographic fieldwork in Athens since 2013. More information on this ongoing research project can be found at aestheticsofcrisis.org. As an Andrew W. Mellon Digital Humanities fellow, Julia hopes to explore the intersections between visual anthropology and digital humanities scholarship. Currently, she is serving as a teaching assistant in the digital media studies course Essential Digital Media Toolkit.

Newsletter Submission
The Mellon DH Fellows are creating a newsletter this year to serve as an outlet for DH-related events in the greater Rochester area. As we prepare for our October newsletter, we would love to include any DH-related announcements you would like to make. To make a submission, please contact us at urmellonfellows@gmail.com by 12:00pm, Tuesday, October 3. The final version of the newsletter will be sent out the first week of October. Announcements must be 50 words or less and include relevant information: date and time, how to RSVP, and a link to the relevant webpage. We reserve the right to edit for space but encourage links or visuals for readers who are interested to learn more information.

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Categories
Blog Events

Recap: “Cultural Approaches to Digital Heritage” Keynote Lecture

Dr. Victoria Szabo, Associate Research Professor of Visual and Media Studies from Duke University delivered the keynote lecture, entitled “Cultural Approaches to Digital Heritage,” to a group of engaged audience in the Welles-Brown room on March 2, 2017.

The word “cultural heritage” often invokes regressive politics and obsessive identification with one’s past, as historian David Lowenthal most famously contends “as hopes of progress fade, heritage consoles us with tradition.” Despite the antithetical relation between heritage and new technologies, Szabo’s keynote lecture offers a retort to the conservatism associated with the term. Specifically, by engaging the “Visualizing Cities” project in North Carolina and Italy, she explores how we tell stories about space over real time and how academics can inform “cultural heritage experience design.” Meanwhile, by experimenting with the lab model as the way in which to produce Digital Humanities scholarship, she also examines how traditional authorship could be questioned and restructured in this often collaborative and participatory process.

One example she mentioned is the use of Augmented Reality (AR) to juxtapose the history of Smith Warehouse with its current function as the Art & Art History Department at Duke University. Since Durham is undergoing processes of rapid gentrification, the site-specific experience provided by AR technology is especially meaningful. Because it gives the user a chance to see and indeed experience the space’s history as a tobacco warehouse which reminds the user just upon what our fortunes have been built. As she says,”in this case, the AR overlay experience becomes an opportunity to mediate or ‘haunt’ the location more visibly.” The most “haunting” example she mentions is perhaps the over-lay of a historic photograph from February 1969 when the African American Society occupied Duke’s administration building to advocate the need of black students which augmented a radical moment in the history of the Civil Rights movement with a recent protest against racism on campus. Needless, such juxtapositions is not only meaningful but also collapses space and time in space and time which reveals the cyclical nature and repetitiveness of history. Also mentioned in her lecture is the “Visualizing Venice” project which engages the city as a lab and offers the students and teachers an unusually productive pedagogical environment.

Watch the keynote.

 

HumanitiesVisitingScholarVictoriaSzabo-030217

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Harry Gu is a PhD student in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester. He is a 2016-2018 Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in the Digital Humanities.

Categories
Alumni People

Jiangtao (Harry) Gu

Education: A.B., History & Media and Society, Magna Cum Laude, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 2013.

Biography: Jiangtao (Harry) Gu is a fifth-year PhD student in the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester where he also holds an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in the Digital Humanities.